REGIONAL COORDINATOR – FREE STATE

CHOC CHILDHOOD CANCER FOUNDATION SOUTH AFRICA                                               

AREA: CHOC FREE STATE REGION

POSITION: REGIONAL COORDINATOR

REPORT TO: REGIONAL MANAGER FS

START DATE: 1ST June  2022

 

MAIN PURPOSE: To coordinate and provide the necessary administrative, financial and database support that also includes assisting with fundraising initiatives where needed. Together with the members of the Free State team, to take CHOC’s work forward by maintaining an effective and well-organised regional office. The incumbent’s job description is not limited to the following.

THE RESPONSIBILITIES ARE:

 Administrative Duties:

  • Provide office administrative assistance
  • Keep the database and coordination of documentation up to date.
  • Check daily all incoming e-mails, to distribute as necessary and take action on those responsible for.
  • Take minutes of staff meetings, and send draft for RM’s approval and distribute when approved
  • Maintain a staff register
  • Ensure that all papers are filed appropriately and to maintain staff files
  • Collate and update Salesforce data
  • Calculate monthly savings on donations received and submit to head office
  • To carry out stock control once a month and inventory preparation for RM once a year
  • Ensure electronic equipment are in working order. This includes the fax; telephone; printer
  • Accurate stock control is done once a month and inventory preparation for RM once a year. Clean audit at all times.
  • CRM data were accurately collated on Salesforce.

 

 Financial Duties:

  • Undertake the day-to-day financial work and loading on Fraxion.
  • Receive all cash donations, issue receipts, and prepare thank you letters
  • Receive and record sales revenue, issues receipts and secure safety of revenue
  • Maintain the petty cash books and arrange for monies to be banked as necessary.
  • To distribute and record the Transport and Bereavement Funds to parent/care-givers
  • To prepare cashbook and cash flow report monthly for the RM to be checked and then submitted to Head Office
  • Manage the counting of tin monies
  • Manage the jumble sale
  • The cashbook and PC is collated monthly for Northern Region
  • Manage office supplies and equipment and undertake stock control and co-ordinate inventories

 

 Support Programs, Marketing and Awareness Events:

  • Provide assistance with CHOC’s support programs
  • Assist with the participation of national campaign at regional level by ensuring the campaign plan (that was drawn up with RM input) is implemented. Assist with any enquiries surrounding the event/campaign.
  • Assist with the public relations tasks to promote the event or campaign as per PR plan drawn up with RM input.
  • Assist with fundraising and awareness events
  • Assist with identifying potential donors and other stakeholders.
  • Undertake Salesforce input
  • Order and distribute branding material.

THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE POST

Qualification: Grade 12 with an administration, finance, and office management related qualification.

Experience and skills:

  • At least 5 years’ experience in general administration and bookkeeping preferably in the NGO
  • High computer literacy, particularly in MS Office; and preferably in database systems (CRM),
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills in English is essential, as well as fluency in English, Afrikaans and an additional predominant language spoken in the Free State (Sotho, tswana, xhosa)
  • Strong administration, organizational and coordination skills.
  • Good with figures and a basic understanding of accounting, financial management and reporting.
  • A valid unendorsed South African driver’s license is essential.

Attributes:

  • A team player who also works well independently
  • A strong work ethic; accuracy; accountability; honesty & integrity; a master at time management; good interpersonal skills; strong alignment with CHOC’s mission and values; radiate professionalism; A highly motivated individual with a willingness to take initiative and responsibility.

Salary in the range of R174 000 – R192 000 per annum, CHOC contributes towards a pension fund and medical aid after a successful probationary period.

To apply submit your application together with supporting documents with the names and contact details of at least three recent referees to reach [email protected] (subject line state: FS REGIONAL COORDINATOR) no later than 8th May 2022

Regional Development Coordinator (Fundraiser)

 Position: Regional Development Coordinator (Fundraiser) 

Based at: Centurion, City of Tshwane 

Reports to: Regional Manager – Northern Region 

Purpose: To contribute to the financial sustainability of the region by assisting with the development of a fundraising strategy and actively contributing to the financial growth in the region to meet the annual income targets. 

Responsibilities: 

Fundraising and Donor Relationships: 

1. To provide a financial sustainability of the region with the support the Regional Manager by maintaining and growing the donor database. 

2. To build active relationships with potential and existing donors and stakeholders. 

3. To assist with donor communication, requests, and acknowledgments. 

4. To develop events and campaign strategies and plans to achieve regional and national campaign objectives. 

5. To successful pre-plan and execute fundraising events and campaigns in collaboration with the Regional Manager, volunteers, and relevant staff. 

6. To develop comprehensive operating plans and budget for each event/campaign. 

7. To co-ordinate the design and production of all event/campaign related marketing material in line with CHOC’s Corporate Identity as well relevant merchandise. To monitor, asses and report on events and campaigns fundraising status (pre, during and post-event/campaign). 

8. To work in collaboration with the Regional Communication Assistant and National Events Coordinator to generate publicity for campaign. 

Development Strategy 

1. To increase funding by creating and implementing a fundraising plan that details how the region solicits donors and identifies funding sources such as corporates, grants, foundations, schools, community organisations, in-kind donations, charitable events and marketing opportunities. 

2. To share the fundraising plans with the Regional Manager for oversight and leadership. 

Public Relations: 

1. To create regional marketing materials, social media and advertising campaigns as part of a public relations strategy. 

2. To expand the brand visibility to target audiences through community relations, speaking engagements, newsletters, and charitable events in the region 

Corporate Volunteering 

1. To develop and manage a regional corporate volunteering programme; 

2. To liaise with regional staff in identifying corporate volunteering opportunities. 

General Administration, Data Management & Reporting: 

1. To maintain the CRM with timely updates of all records relating to donors, donations, campaigns, and events. 

2. To prepare the monthly regional reports regarding fundraising income and in-kind savings and submit to the Regional Manager. 

3. To submit weekly reports on the status of donors, events, and campaigns. 

4. To provide input to the Regional Manager with the income section of the region’s annual budget. 

5. To ensure that all CHOC policies and procedures are implemented and adhered to. 

6. To undertake all responsibilities and tasks embracing CHOC’s values, ethos, and behaviours 

Applicant Requirements: 

Education: Suitably qualified candidate with a relevant bachelor’s degree. 

Experience: A minimum of 3 years corporate fundraising experience within a NPO (Non-Profit Organisation) as well as in but not limited to, public relations, prospecting, business development and negotiation. Persuasive writing, strong verbal communication and the ability to interact with company executives. 

Additional Training/Experience: High level computer literacy, excellent written and verbal communication skills, social media, research skills and high net worth networking. 

Skills and Attributes: Strong proven relationship building, and solicitation skills are important. Attention to detail, organizing skills, ability to work under pressure, creative and analytical skills, good interpersonal skills and the ability to relate to a wide range of corporate donors, strong planning skills, including the ability to anticipate tasks, set priorities, meet deadlines and function smoothly under strict deadlines and shifting priorities, strong team player who also works well independently. 

Other: Driver’s license essential 

CHOC contributes towards a pension fund and medical aid after a successful probationary period. 

All applications inclusive of a covering letter should be emailed to [email protected], clearly indicate NR Regional Development Coordinator :Fundraiser on the subject line. 

Closing date: 5 March 2022 

Childhood Cancer in low and middle-income countries

Every year, according to the World Health Organization, an estimated 400 000 children and adolescents of 0-19 years old develop cancer. Leukaemias, brain cancers, lymphomas, and solid tumours, such as neuroblastoma and Wilms tumours are the most common childhood cancers. Cure rates in high-income countries (HICs) with 20% of the world’s children with cancer exceed 80%, while only 30% in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are cured.

 

The survival rate of childhood cancer in South Africa is around 55-60% and seems to be on the rise.

 

The economies of most LMICs are at an early stage of development; stages characterised by poverty, shortages of health-care workers, weak health systems, low education levels, poor access to modern technology, and a paucity of health care facilities. LMICs also have younger populations and therefore a larger proportion of children with cancer than HICs. Additionally, interventions such as public health campaigns which impact on early diagnosis and referral which translate into improved outcomes for adults may have limited impact on decreasing the incidence of paediatric malignancies are not related to modifiable risk factors. However, a few LMICs have seen declines in childhood mortality because of improvements in infectious diseases control. Consequently, noncommunicable disease such as childhood cancer are on the rise and it is likely that the Covid-19 pandemic will reverse gains made in some countries or further exacerbate progress due to resource constraints experienced from a health system – based, supply perspective.

 

While there is an overall need to strengthen systems to improve diagnostics and treatment for patients of all ages with cancer, dedicated centres for childhood cancer treatment require specialized diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities, and the ability to manage complications. Childhood cancer care should ideally be managed in a limited number of treatment centres in which multi-disciplinary resources and expertise are concentrated with good satellite centres who can deliver some treatment, thereby decreasing the burden on families, providing rapid management of complications, and decreasing abandonment of treatment. Intensive care units (ICUs) are imperative for the delivery of intensive chemotherapy, but centres lacking ICUs will also be able to cure a portion of children. Stable drug supplies are mandatory as drug shortages impact negatively on survival. Nutritional support is particularly important in LMICs where malnutrition at diagnosis or during treatment is prevalent with an adverse impact on outcome.

 

It is essential to have individuals trained in paediatric oncology i.e., paediatric oncologists, surgeons, pathologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, pharmacists, nurses palliative care and allied care workers. Inpatient and outpatient beds preferably designated for paediatric oncology patients is essential. Infection control methods such as a hand hygiene programme, isolation capabilities, and a strong anti-microbial stewardship programme are desirable. Basic haematologic, biochemical, microbiologic, and pathologic laboratory services capable of timely turnaround is vital to the successful delivery of cancer care. Although advanced diagnostic modalities, such as flow cytometry and cytogenetics, are available in HICs, their absence does not preclude the establishment of a paediatric oncology centre.

 

Diagnostic imaging capabilities are necessary. Advanced modalities such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are ideal, but basic modalities, such as plain radiographs and ultrasonography are sufficient to begin treating childhood cancer. Reliable supplies of chemotherapeutic agents and supportive care medications, such as antimicrobials, antiemetics, and analgesics, are crucial. According to the WHO only 29% of low-income countries report that cancer medicines are available to their populations compared to 96% of high-income countries. Blood product availability is vital as treatment protocols may cause bone marrow suppression, necessitating the timely and reliable delivery of safe blood products. However, this is not the case for all chemotherapies; treatment for several malignancies requires minimal transfusion support.

 

Abandonment of therapy is a significant cause of treatment failure in many LMICs. Financial support, provision of transport and accommodation decreases the risk of abandonment and must be considered an essential part of oncology care in LMICs. Many factors contribute to treatment abandonment, including a lack of financial resources, poor disease comprehension, cultural factors, belief in alternative medicines, fear of treatment toxicity, inadequate care on the part of health care workers, and decreased awareness. just as some level of basic supportive care capacity is necessary to treat children with cancer, basic educational and aid programs aimed at preventing abandonment are also imperative. Addressing the emotional, social, financial, and spiritual needs of children and families facilitates adherence to treatment, improves quality of life, and reduces the risk of abandonment.

Surgery is a vital component for diagnosis and treatment of many paediatric malignancies, e.g., Wilms tumour but many cancers are curable without surgical intervention. Similarly, radiation therapy is used for a variety of paediatric malignancies e.g., Hodgkin lymphoma, Wilms tumour, and sarcomas. However, in some cases, substituting additional chemotherapy or surgery can result in cure.

 

Different childhood cancers require different treatment intensities for maximum cure rates; for example, the chemotherapy for Wilms tumour is far less intense than for acute myeloid leukemia. Risk stratification systems is one of the major achievements in paediatric oncology where treatment intensity is matched to the disease and the disease risk, reducing both over- and under-treatment. It is imperative to avoid overtreatment in LMICs, as it contributes to an increase in treatment-related mortality. The balance point for each malignancy is essential to optimize therapy and curing the maximum number of children possible. The availability of supportive care is key to the balanced approach.

 

Collaboration with centres of excellence in HICs allows multi-disciplinary expertise with local knowledge and capabilities.

Collection of basic data on patient demographics, disease characteristics, and treatment outcomes, including cause of death, allows for evaluation of specific treatment protocols, and allows for modification of therapy. Many factors contribute to morbidity and mortality, e.g., treatment-related mortality, relapse, or treatment abandonment. Health care workers in many LMICs lack the time to collect, review, and analyse outcome information. In most settings, a resolute data manager with sufficient training, infrastructure, and support is needed to ensure accurate and timely data entry. Collection and analysis of data are neither academic research nor a luxury, but outcome monitoring is essential to improving the care and outcomes of children with cancer. Quality improvement efforts in LMICs make the difference between life and death.

 

Most LMICs lack policies to ensure good paediatric oncology care, and do not have a National Cancer Plan (NCP), a public health programme aimed at increasing the diagnosis, reducing the number of deaths and improving the quality of life of cancer patients, through the implementation of evidence-based strategies for the prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment, palliation, and research for innovative solutions and evaluation of outcomes. An NCP is to promote the implementation of cost-effective measures beneficial for the maximum number of persons in the population. NCPs promote the development of management guidelines, emphasise early with easy referral pathways, lowers the morbidity and mortality, and improves the quality of life of cancer patients, no matter where they are born.

 

Leaving no one behind includes government’s commitment to all children and their families including our most vulnerable children with non-communicable, long-term conditions.

 

Professor Gita Naidu Chair: South African Children’s Cancer Study Group

 

Sandhya Singh Director, Non-Communicable Diseases National Department of Health

 

Hedley Lewis Chief Executive Officer of CHOC Childhood Cancer Foundation South Africa

 

 

For Media Queries contact Hedley Lewis:  0829947655 – [email protected]

 

International Childhood Cancer Day (ICCD) – 15 February 2022

International Childhood Cancer Day (ICCD) | CHOC South Africa

The 15th of February marks International Childhood Cancer Day (ICCD) and is used to continue to create a greater awareness and education to empower all of us to recognise the early warning signs of childhood cancer, make informed choices about our children’s health and counter fears and misconceptions about childhood cancer.  Each year, a distinct group of childhood cancer stakeholders is highlighted: #throughourhands giving tribute to children and adolescents with cancer (2021), #throughyourhands with focus on healthcare teams and volunteers (2022) and #throughtheirhands paying tribute to the families and caregivers (2023).

 

The theme this year is #throughyourhands highlighting the incredible individuals whose hands care for children and teens with cancer or life-threatening blood disorders. Just as these children are entrusted in the hands of the multi-disciplinary teams, every child’s journey is also in our hands. It is our responsibility to know the early warnings signs for swift detection to be able to refer patients timeously to specialised treatment and care and in doing so decrease the mortality and morbidity of cancer in children.

 

Every year, according to the World Health Organization, an estimated 400 000 children and adolescents of 0-19 years old develop cancer. Leukaemias, brain cancers, Lymphomas, and solid tumours, such as Neuroblastoma and Wilms tumours are the most common childhood cancers. Cure rates in high-income countries (HICs) with 20% of the world’s children with cancer exceed 80%, while only 30% in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are cured. The survival rate of childhood cancer in South Africa is around 55-60% and seems to be on the rise.

 

Public health campaigns impact on early diagnosis and referral which translates into improved outcomes but may have limited impact on decreasing the incidence of paediatric malignancies are not related to modifiable risk factors. Dedicated centres for childhood cancer treatment requires specialised diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities, and the ability to manage complications. Childhood cancer care should ideally be managed in a limited number of treatment centres in which resources and expertise are concentrated with good satellite centres who can deliver some treatment, thereby decreasing the burden on families, providing rapid management of complications, and decreasing abandonment of treatment.

 

It is essential to have individuals trained in paediatric oncology i.e., paediatric oncologists, surgeons, pathologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, pharmacists, nurses, and allied care workers. Different childhood cancers require different treatment intensities for maximum cure rates; for example, the chemotherapy for Wilms tumour is far less intense than for acute Myeloid Leukaemia. Collaboration with centres of excellence in HICs allows multi-disciplinary expertise with local knowledge and capabilities.

 

Every child, teenager and parent who starts their childhood cancer journey, have hope that their child will survive and live a long, happy, healthy, and fulfilled life. As a global childhood cancer community, we believe that increased awareness and accurate information and knowledge can empower all of us to recognize the early warning signs of childhood cancer, make informed choices about our children’s health and counter fears and misconceptions about childhood cancer.   During the prevention, care, and management; as well as the rehabilitation and integration of survivors, there are many role-players that contribute to the success thereof. Parents and families have hope when they trust their children and teenagers #throughyourhands and on ICCD 2022 we salute the healthcare workers, allied workers and NGOs who impact on the lives of children and teens with cancer.  They are the voices of the families and give hope to the children, teens and their families to complete the cancer treatment. Together, and #throughyourhands we can reach the WHO Global Childhood Cancer Initiative (GICC) of 60% survival rate by 2030 and in doing reduce the suffering of the children.

 

Covid-19 has had a substantial impact on both those that treat and those who are treated. Leaving no one behind includes government’s commitment to all children and their families including our most vulnerable children with non-communicable, long-term conditions. Let us amplify the visibility of childhood cancer at all levels and reach the breadth of stakeholders with the power to effect life-saving change.

 

Together, we can sustain and reinforce healthcare professionals in the fulfilment of their all-important role and make a positive difference for children and teenagers with cancer worldwide.

 

If you are concerned your child may have cancer, please refer your child or teenager here: https://choc.org.za/choc-patient-referral-pathways/

 

 

Professor Gita Naidu Chair: South African Children’s Cancer Study Group

 

Sandhya Singh Director, Non-Communicable Diseases National Department of Health

 

Hedley Lewis Chief Executive Officer of CHOC Childhood Cancer Foundation South Africa

 

 

For Media Queries contact Hedley Lewis:  0829947655 – [email protected]